Posts Tagged ‘class’

Online Course: Drawing Nature with Rachel Mirus

Close observation can inspire wonderful works of imagination. This course will begin with observational drawing, which combines visual observation and drawing technique to build the keen observation skills foundational for both artists and naturalists. Using example plant and animal groups, we will review growth and body patterns, learning through drawing. We will introduce field sketching, grayscale and color drawing, and watercolor layer technique. The course will culminate with examples and projects in imaginative nature art, launching you into your own nature illustrating journey!

Read More

(In-Person) BioU: Freshwater Macroinvertebrates

In this course we will explore the major invertebrate groups found in freshwater habitats. We will cover the ecology and differences between aquatic habitats. This is a hands-on course that will include instruction in a range of field sampling techniques and sample processing. Using preserved samples, and samples collected during the course, we will cover all of the major taxonomic groups of aquatic invertebrates to the family level, and pursue a subset to the genus level. Lab work will include microscopy and identification using a range of resources.  By the end of this course you should be familiar with the common macroinvertebrate orders at a glance, and have the taxonomic tools at your fingertips to identify whatever you may encounter.

Read More

(In-Person) BioU: Field Herpetology

Amphibians are among one of the most imperiled groups of animals on earth and many reptile species are in sharp decline, even here in Vermont. Increasingly, reptiles and amphibians are receiving attention from state, federal, and non-profit conservation organizations, so knowledge of and experience with these secretive animals can be an asset in the fields of ecology, conservation, and education. Throughout this two-day course, participants will learn about the almost 30 species of frog, salamander, snake, and turtle found in Northeastern Vermont, including how to identify them, their ecology, habitat requirements, and the methodology used by biologists to sample their populations. The course will include a combination of active searches, standardized surveys, catch-and-release trapping, radio telemetry, and educational presentations such that participants become confident in their ability to identify each species occurring in Northeast Vermont, what their conservation needs and threats are, and some of the methods used by professionals to study their populations in the wild.

Read More

Winter Wild Edibles

For those willing to get a little frosty, there is no need to pack up your foraging baskets during the cold winter months. Bundle up and join teacher naturalist Ken Benton as we learn to identify and sustainably harvest a variety of wild foods from the surrounding landscape.  We’ll bake with spruce, fir, and pine needles and sip on a warm mug…

Read More

Black Ash Basketmaking

Learn every step of traditional black ash basketry in this forest-to-basket class! Abenaki basketmakers Kerry and Aaron Wood will teach each step of the basketmaking process beginning with a walk through an ash stand, assessing living trees for basket quality, processing ash splints, weaving a basket, and exploring indigenous cultural values of ash trees. Participants will go home with their own foraging basket and lid.

Read More

Photography for Naturalists Workshop

Become a better photographer by tuning into nature, and learn to harness your camera by becoming a better naturalist. In this morning workshop, we’ll blend photography techniques and naturalist skills to achieve a deeper connection with nature and capture great photographs.

Read More